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Critical Concerns for Healthcare Receivables Leaders in the COVID-19 Era

Critical Concerns for Healthcare Receivables Leaders in the COVID-19 Era

Right now, healthcare providers have the weight of the world on their shoulders. Workers on the front lines are waging battle against a pandemic that has taken lives, livelihoods, and people’s sense of security.

Meanwhile, administrators are trying to keep the doors open, and revenue cycle teams are working tirelessly to protect the financial health of their organization. Revenues are declining due in part to people’s reluctance to seek traditional in-person care, various state orders prohibiting collection activity, and hardships that are making it tough for patients to satisfy their medical needs.

Under these circumstances, proper and effective management of healthcare receivables is paramount.

Last week, I sat down with my colleague Sara Woggerman, compliance consultant at Ontario Systems, for “Managing Patient Receivables in the COVID-19 Era: What Providers Need to Know.” During the webinar, we discussed what providers and their first- and third-party collection partners must do to navigate the crisis—and what they can do to position themselves for long-term stability and success. (Be sure to download the webinar replay here.)
 
 

Collection Practices that Ruin Reputations and Raise Legal Issues

It’s crucial that you clearly define, and clearly understand, how your A/R agents and business associates (first- and third-party collectors) engage patients for collection purposes. Otherwise, you could risk serious harm to your reputation and your business operations.

Here are some of the key issues you’ll need to address to avoid critical missteps.

Are you complying with state orders?

Some states have prohibited all collections activity during this time. We covered specific examples during the webinar, but a good real-time resource for this information is Cornerstone Support’s Coronavirus Guidance. Other solid COVID-19 resources include the National Consumer Law Center, InsideARM, and ACA International.

 

Are you and your collection partners in lockstep?

As part of your pandemic response plan, you should make clear to third-party debt collectors and legal partners your standards and expectations for how they’ll manage your receivables and how they should communicate with patients during COVID-19. Specifically, you will want to discuss your collection partners’ workflow regarding:

  • Content, sufficiency, and applicability of their hardship policy;
  • Process to identify patients who have been impacted financially because of COVID 19;
  • Handling of existing payment arrangements;
  • Requests to waive or suspend interest or payments;
  • Compliance with pandemic state collection restrictions;
  • Status of all litigation and garnishment holds; and
  • Use of national disaster codes when furnishing information to credit reporting agencies.

In addition, your first- and third-party collectors should provide you with regular updates on changes to their collection practices,  changes to state collection restrictions, changes to their policies and procedures, and any complaint trends during this period.

 

Are remote agents complying with HIPAA?

With most collection teams now working remotely, you and your partner agencies should be having conversations about managing HIPAA compliance and the steps they’re taking to keep patient data safe (e.g., communicating with patients within a protected, secure, encrypted environment; working in an enclosed, private area of the home).
 

How are you engaging patients?

Communicate with empathy on inbound calls and use the time to educate patients about their payment and self-service options. Request permission to deliver disclosures electronically on a preferred digital channel so you can improve the patient experience. Some states are requiring collectors to ask patients whether they need accommodations such as suspension of payments; this is probably a sensible practice across the board.

We also recommend reviewing the language in your extraordinary collection activity notices. If it currently includes legal actions such as garnishments, repossessions, collection litigation, etc., you will want to remove this information from your 501(r) notices in states that prohibit the seizure of stimulus fund payments. You’ll also want to consider whether such actions could be considered an unfair, deceptive, or abusive trade practice in states that do not have stimulus fund protections in place.

Are your enforced collection actions appropriate?

Be mindful of what garnishments you had in place before COVID-19 and how your legal partners are interacting with your patients. Consider putting a stop to any further garnishments (bearing in mind that stimulus payments from the government can’t be garnished), and revisit your litigation strategies, until emergency orders are lifted.

Depending on your jurisdiction, there may be no court available for a patient in debt to fight a garnishment order—thus, no opportunity for due process. Inflexibility in circumstances of hardship and/or aggressive collection actions could generate negative press coverage, and perhaps even a class-action lawsuit against the collector and healthcare provider involved.
 
 

Limited Options for Patient Engagement and Payments

In the COVID-19 era, many people are fearful of exposure to others. They prefer virtual encounters whenever possible. This makes digital engagement and payment channels vital for patients and providers. Patients want to access their accounts at their convenience, see what their payment options are, and engage (complete admissions and consent forms, for example) through preferred communication channels such as text, email, portal, and chat.

In its Trends in Healthcare Payments Annual Report (10th edition), InstaMed highlights an increasing need for the electronic payment experience. Among InstaMed’s findings:

  • 87% of providers are still using manual processes and paper for collections.
  • 78% of providers can’t collect $1,000+ patient balances within 30 days.

The report also highlights that many patients cannot satisfy a $1,000+ receivable, and their ranks are growing. In order to keep the lines of communication open with such patients during the collection process, providers need to understand the financial challenges their patients are experiencing and communicate with them in the manner and at the time they prefer.

Providers are well advised to adopt tools that can help ease the burden of collections, manage compliance issues, and make the payment of medical debt as easy as possible. Yet many providers are slow to adopt these new tools.

One reason for the lack of widespread adoption among collectors is the fear of compliance risk associated with texting. But complying with the Telephone Consumer Protection Act is as simple as getting express consent to text, which isn’t difficult to obtain. With a compliance-minded digital communication platform, you can send an email instead of a letter, or send a text instead of placing a call—ultimately making your business more accessible to patients in the manner they prefer to communicate.

There are many ways you can use integrated communication and payment technology to improve the patient experience and recovery efforts all at once:

  • Introduce patients to self-service/payment portal on billing statements.
  • Use IVR on inbound calls to introduce various payment options, including financial assistance.
  • Allow patients to pay by text message.

With capabilities like these, you’ll not only mitigate the impact of unpaid balances, but also offset shrinking revenues due to telehealth and other alternatives to traditional healthcare delivery that are becoming increasingly popular in the wake of COVID-19.
 
 

For More Collections and Compliance Insights and Tips

Sara and I covered a lot of ground in our discussion, including state-by-state collection restrictions and the legal risks of blurring the lines between first- and third-party debt collectors. To learn more about managing healthcare receivables and compliance risks during this crisis, and potential future crises, be sure to download your copy ofManaging Patient Receivables in the COVID-19 Era: What Providers Need to Know.”

Here are some additional collection- and compliance-related resources you might find helpful:

 

GetixHealth Increases Claim Follow-up Efficiency by 60%

Learn how this leading RCM provider transformed its collection team's performance with the addition of a simple EHR complement.

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2020 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

GetixHealth Boosts Claim Follow-up Efficiency by 60% With the Artiva Magnify™ Solution

GetixHealth Boosts Claim Follow-up Efficiency by 60% With the Artiva Magnify™ Solution

GetixHealth, a leading provider of revenue cycle management (RCM) services to the healthcare industry, has experienced substantial growth over the past several years. With 250+ A/R agents across the globe, the company needed a better way to manage performance.

Like many healthcare providers and RCM service providers, GetixHealth was struggling with big hindrances on the back end of the revenue cycle. Among the biggest was a lack of visibility into what collectors were doing during and between phone calls with payers.

With the addition of Artiva Magnify, a simple, EHR-friendly solution, the company slashed payer hold times and increased claim follow-up efficiency by 60%.

Read the full story.

Managing A/R from Afar: How Well Are Your Remote Agents Performing?

Managing A/R from Afar: How Well Are Your Remote Agents Performing?

The healthcare industry’s remote A/R workforce is growing fast, as more providers and RCM service providers discover the benefits of this arrangement and build the infrastructure to make it work. According to a 2019 Deloitte survey, 56% of executives surveyed plan to have at least some contact center employees working at home in the next two years.

While this is a positive trend, A/R leaders are struggling to manage their remote agents’ performance. Many are forced to rely on agents’ self-reporting, which can be unreliable and doesn’t lend itself to effective performance management.

If your remote A/R team isn’t firing on all cylinders, you’re still miles away from optimizing your revenue cycle.

What’s the secret to helping remote A/R agents become more effective and engaged in their jobs? How can you make informed decisions about how best to use the talent you have? How can you do all this with ease while scaling your operation?

The answer to all of the above is real-time performance data put to good use.

 

Remote A/R Agent Performance: The Crucial Data You’re Missing

If you have remote A/R agents, you need real-time visibility into a variety of qualitative and quantitative performance measures including:

  • How collectors are using their time (how much time spent on the phone, how much time they spend on hold, number of claims worked per hour, etc.)
  • How appropriately and effectively they interact with payers and patients
  • Any procedural errors they might be making
  • Opportunities they may be missing to follow up on claims or serve patients better

With these data, you can take significant steps to improve productivity, ensure compliance with employer and payer standards, and keep engagement and morale high through timely encouragement and feedback. You can also compare productivity levels to reallocate your resources for the best possible results.

These are the keys to not only cutting days in A/R, but also improving efficiency and creating a more motivated, loyal workforce.

 

Continuous Performance Management (CPM): What Remote Agents Need to Succeed

A/R performance management

Source: HR Technologist

“Traditionally, performance management has been a forward-looking solution based entirely on hindsight. But organizational culture is evolving to one of continuous feedback powered by technology, where managers can foresee problems based on current employee performance and initiate any form of course correction to bring the employee back on track.” – HR Technologist

 

4 Ways to Use Real-Time Data to Manage Remote A/R Agents

You require certain things of your remote agents to keep the revenue cycle humming. They need certain things from their managers to understand the importance of their role and increase their value to the organization.

If you’re looking to take charge of performance management, energize your team, and improve their results over time, these four capabilities are mission critical.

Voice and data monitoring

Without detailed, timely information related to every call made and every account worked, it’s tough to assess (let alone improve) remote agents’ performance. Managers should be able to listen in on agents’ calls, whether in progress or recorded, and monitor all account-related activities and updates as they occur.

Dashboard displays

Every agent and manager should have a dashboard display that streams real-time data including accounts worked per payer call, hold times, call volumes, time spent on the phone, etc. This shared view allows managers to deliver valuable coaching as needed and gives agents the means to self-correct.

Performance alerts

Setting daily and monthly performance goals is critical. So is monitoring agents’ progress and knowing when they aren’t making the most of their time or advancing toward their goals. Any signs of declining performance should trigger timely notifications so managers can intervene early and effectively.

Collector rankings

Friendly competition is a powerful motivator. It boosts engagement, builds team cohesion, and drives progress. Agents should always know, at a glance, how they rank against the team’s top performers so they can use the data at their disposal to try to improve their standing.

 

Next Up: Automating QA to Drive Efficiency and Progress

Manual quality assurance (QA) processes have plenty of downsides for A/R leaders and teams. Among the biggest are the time managers must spend mining data and scoring agents (leaving less time for coaching and training) and agents’ perceptions of bias and unfairness.

For providers with remote teams, automation can turn QA into a less burdensome, more valuable performance management tool. In a future post, we’ll explain how automated QA works and why it’s a must have for the A/R front line.

Want more insights and tips you can use to improve your financial health? Subscribe to the OS blog, and we’ll deliver them straight to your inbox.

GetixHealth Increases Claim Follow-up Efficiency by 60%

Learn how this leading RCM provider transformed its collection team's performance with the addition of a simple EHR complement.

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2020 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

Automation in RCM: How to Remove Friction from Your Revenue Cycle Processes

Automation in RCM: How to Remove Friction from Your Revenue Cycle Processes

In the healthcare industry today, there’s a lot of buzz and hype surrounding automation. Large healthcare networks, medical facilities, and RCM service providers looking to achieve a more efficient, robust revenue cycle are eager to invest in automation technologies.

All this excitement is understandable. Any technology that can free employees to focus on more complex, high-value tasks—and make revenue cycle operations easy to scale—holds great promise for improving providers’ financial health.

Given the financial and market pressures providers now face, and the potential top- and bottom-line benefits automation technology can provide, there’s no question that automation is the future of revenue cycle management (RCM). The question healthcare executives should now be asking is, “Are the practical benefits and ROI available, here and now?”

They are, as long as you take a practical approach to investing.

 

In this post, I’ll share my recommendations for how you can maximize your tech investment. But first, let’s delve into the three main types of automation technology and how they can improve RCM.

 

3 Automation Technologies that Are Revolutionizing RCM

“There is no doubt that technology has transformed the world of revenue cycle. [ . . . ] The automation of processes not only saves time, it reduces the chances of errors to allow for a steady stream of revenue and cash collections.”

 

Megan Zannetti, VP of Revenue Cycle, Graham Healthcare Group

Automation has the power to streamline and improve revenue cycle performance and lower operational costs by taking unnecessary manual touches out of the process and redirecting valuable knowledge workers to even higher-yield tasks. Here’s how current automation technologies work—often in interrelated fashion—and how they impact RCM.

Robotic Process Automation (RPA)

RPA can be easily programmed and deployed to interact with software applications just as human workers do. Designed to handle repetitive rule-based tasks, RPA can help reduce errors in the revenue cycle and ensure more uniform revenue cycle processes.

Example use cases: RPA can be used to automate status inquiries or reduce payer hold times for A/R agents when calls are still warranted.

“I do think [RPA] has tremendous potential to expand within healthcare . . . and the primary use case that I see is in [the] revenue cycle.

 

I worked for a third-party claims organization for about 15 years. [I]t could be easier to train a fleet of robots who are doing repetitive activities and similar activities than it may be [to train] a large human staff. And so I see there being tremendous potential not just for the ability to accommodate change, but because there are a lot of rules-based activities within the revenue cycle process as well.”

 

A.J. Hanna, Executive Director, Ascension Ministry Service Center

Artificial Intelligence (AI)

AI is a field of study within computer science that strives to create intelligent machines that work and react like humans and become smarter over time. Speech recognition, visual perception, language translation, and decision-making are among the most common applications.

Example use case: AI can be used to model and predict availability of important resources such as access to a payer representative when gaining prior authorization or following up on a claim. While the various forms of automation technology can lessen our need to call payer IVRs, when a call is warranted, we want to undertake that task in the most efficient manner possible.

“The capabilities of AI and other technology-based tools to improve data accuracy and process efficiency and support overall financial improvement for the revenue cycle present compelling cases for organizational investment.”

 

ECG Management Consultants

Data Analytics (“Big Data”)

Big Data Analytics is the complex process of examining large and varied data sets, or “big data,” to uncover information such as hidden patterns, previously unknown correlations, market trends, and customer preferences. This data science helps providers make informed business decisions.

Example use case: Big Data can be used to better understand your patients’ behaviors and preferences with regard to your ongoing engagement with them through calls, portals, email, text, and social media. Armed with this information, you can ensure your patient engagement strategy is responsive to the preferences of each patient while improving overall patient satisfaction.

“[D]ata analytics has and will continue to play a significant role in efficient and profitable management of health systems. [ . . . ] Operational efficiencies and cost reduction through analysis of performance metrics can be achieved from the front-end contact center to back-end offices, and everywhere in between. [C]ountless organizations have increased profitability through revenue cycle optimization.”

 

Deloitte report, “The future of artificial intelligence in health care” (2019)

4 Tips for Maximizing Your Investment in Automation Technology

While automating RCM processes can help address major operational and financial challenges, automation must be applied intentionally to ensure you realize its benefits. The following practices can help ensure your tech investment delivers the greatest possible return.

1. Identify high-value opportunities.

What are the real business problems you’re facing? Where are your operational needs, inefficiencies, and gaps? Any new automation solution should align closely with them.

To identify process improvement candidates, focus on tasks that are high volume, rule-based, and repetitive—i.e., work that shouldn’t require manual touches.

As current candidates are monitored for success and new candidates are identified in an ongoing closed-loop process, you can continue to ease friction in the revenue cycle, create a virtuous cycle of improvement, and accelerate your revenue gains.

2. Look for ways to “reskill” your most important asset—your people.

Don’t think of automation as a way to generate ROI by simply reducing head count. Instead, look to unlock the talent you have and improve employee satisfaction and engagement at the same time.

With the support of automation technology that frees them from routine tasks, your employees can focus on more high-yield, productive work. They’ll also have the insights and tools they need to make better-informed business decisions. As your existing workforce becomes more informed, effective, and impactful, they’ll deliver more value to your organization.

3. Aim for higher-than-linear yields.

The application of automation technology shouldn’t be determined simply by the task at hand. It should also be applied in the context of current business conditions: time, talent, expected yield, and budget.

The relationship of technology to yield is NOT linear. More technology may not be better. Your organization’s progression across the technology axis (see below) will be determined by yield targets you’ve deemed acceptable.

Your business challenge is to achieve yields in the green bubble above—in other words, well beyond a simple linear investment. To do so, you should follow the tips I’ve previously outlined: 1) attack and automate the right problems; and 2) free up resources to move to higher, more productive endeavors.

4. Be forthright about asking for practical solutions.

Many technology providers offering automation solutions tout exciting new capabilities and features such as RPA, neural networks, machine learning, data analytics, and AI. Your challenge will be to navigate these many options to apply the right technology to the business challenges you’re currently targeting.

Be wary of optimism and hype. These technologies are amazing, but according to experts, they are still in their infancy. You deserve practical solutions that are a precise match for your requirements and goals.

Ask your technology provider to help you align automation with practical, proven results. By creating this practical momentum, you can then launch into new use cases as your ROI unfolds and the technology continues to mature.

Success Story: Automation on the A/R Front Line

For GetixHealth, long payer hold times and a lack of visibility into agent performance were two major barriers to revenue cycle optimization. But a simple EHR complement, within the first hour of its use, changed everything. Download the success story below to learn how GetixHealth slashed hold times and increased claim follow-up efficiency by 60%.

GetixHealth Increases Claim Follow-up Efficiency by 60%

Learn how this leading RCM provider transformed its collection team's performance with the addition of a simple EHR complement.

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2020 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

4 Things Healthcare Providers Need to Boost Agent Productivity and RCM

4 Things Healthcare Providers Need to Boost Agent Productivity and RCM

Recently, I shared six healthcare industry predictions for 2020. These trends are motivating providers to take a fresh look at their revenue cycle performance in the hope of finding ways to cut costs and boost revenue.

If you’re aiming for similar results this year, your accounts receivable (A/R) team may hold the key.

In truth, most healthcare agents aren’t equipped to maximize their time. As a result, they lose opportunities to recover revenue, and accounts languish in A/R. As providers expand their workforce without addressing common productivity drains, these lost opportunities multiply.

Meanwhile, ineffective agents lose heart and head for the door in large numbers. Providers scramble to backfill positions while scaling their A/R operations. Hiring and onboarding costs continue to rise.

Many healthcare leaders struggle with how to tackle these problems effectively. There are only so many hours in a workday (with a significant portion of an agent’s shift spent navigating IVRs or on hold with payers). Managers can provide only so much guidance and support to on-site agents, and remote agents are practically on their own. “Peak performance” must be defined within these limits.

If this is your thought process, it’s time to start questioning what’s really possible in 2020.

Here are four essentials you need to boost agent productivity, optimize your A/R operation, and transform your revenue cycle.

 

1. Workflows That Prioritize High-Value Tasks

Your investment in people should deliver the highest possible return for your organization. Are your agents dedicating most of their time to performing high-value tasks? An automated A/R environment can help them do that in two important ways.

  • Automation of workflows – Rather than being inundated with tasks that don’t require human intervention, agents are presented only with exceptions to automated tasks (e.g., insurance denials). Codified business rules can ensure high-value accounts are routed to agents in order of importance.
  • Agent schedules – This guides agents through a predetermined order of what work queues should be worked first. It schedules them to move between work queues (based on time of day and/or duration) so they can work accounts more evenly.

 

2. Shorter Payer Hold Times

Time spent on hold is one of the steepest barriers to A/R optimization, and many providers are resigned to it. What can be done to overcome IVR navigation and wait times? Agents have to make their way through the IVR, however painful and wasteful it may be, to connect with live insurance reps.

Here again, with automation and artificial intelligence, providers have a real shot at overcoming this seemingly insurmountable problem and reducing insurance hold times significantly—by up to 80%. If your system automatically navigates payer IVRs and tees up new payer calls while agents are working claims, agents can glide seamlessly from one payer call to the next. As the system performs, it analyzes call data and adjusts the neural network for the expected hold time to route new payer calls more precisely.

 

3. Agent Guidance to Promote Uniformity

All agents have procedures they must follow when working accounts. If a denial is identified, an agent needs to perform certain steps when talking to the payer. Uniformity on the front line improves performance, as agents follow established procedures that work. As performance improves across the board, so does productivity. Having a playbook that’s visible to agents while they work accounts will help them move through the follow-up process more efficiently.

 

4. Real-Time Views of Priority Accounts

The last piece of the productivity puzzle is helping agents make the most out of every payer call. As each payer call is connected, agents should be able to see on their screen exactly which high-priority claims need to be discussed on the call. The system should have a summary of those top 25 key accounts in a gadget that can be used to open the account in a separate tab. This allows an easy transition on the call and helps the agent work many more accounts for each interaction.

 

All of This Is Possible with Your Existing EHR

These transformative changes are achievable without disrupting your EHR workflows or your operation. In fact, you can fill the “EHR gap”—and get the agent productivity tools you’re missing—with a simple complement that’s designed to work seamlessly with your current setup.

You can learn all about it in our free eBook “The Accountable Collector: Transforming Healthcare A/R with One Simple Fix.” Download your copy today, and discover the easy way to supercharge your agents’ performance and results.

 

GetixHealth Increases Claim Follow-up Efficiency by 60%

Learn how this leading RCM provider transformed its collection team's performance with the addition of a simple EHR complement.

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2020 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

6 Predictions for the Healthcare Industry and Revenue Cycle Management in 2020

6 Predictions for the Healthcare Industry and Revenue Cycle Management in 2020

The healthcare industry has seen transformational change in recent years. The ‘20s will bring even more change and uncertainty. Economic, market, and regulatory forces will continue to reshape the landscape, making it even tougher to navigate.
 
With operating margins declining 21% in 2019 (despite positive gains in 2018), providers are struggling to maintain their footing.
 
In response, many are taking a hard look at their operations, business model, and growth strategies. They’re also embracing innovation as a means of strengthening their financial health and ability to compete.
 
 
“Burdened by expensive fixed assets, redundancy, and inefficient utilization levels, health systems need a major course correction if they are to provide 24/7/365 access, shift care to virtual and lower-cost settings, manage new competitive threats, and meet rising consumer expectations. Becoming 2 to 3 percent more operationally fit each year will not keep pace with the rate of change required.” – Geoff Martin, COO & Managing Principal, GE Healthcare Partners
 
In light of this increasing complexity and financial strain, providers will need to make a bold move in 2020 to improve their operations. Below, I’ve outlined my specific predictions for 2020 and why now is the time for providers to act.
 
 

1. Reimbursements Will Continue to Shrink

Healthcare spending is growing out of control; in fact, it’s growing faster than projected GDP growth. According to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, our national health expenditure is expected to grow 5.5% annually through 2026 and account for 19.7% of GDP by 2026 (up from 17.9% in 2016).
 
This growth rate is unsustainable. Unfortunately, the budget cuts required to curb healthcare spending will likely take the form of declining reimbursements—an existing trend that will continue into 2020 and beyond.
 
In a December 2018 survey of 100 healthcare executives, 62% listed declining reimbursements as their #1 organizational challenge. In 2020, that sentiment will undoubtedly spread as providers feel increasing pressure to reduce operating costs and address weaknesses in their revenue cycle.
 
 

2. Commercial Carriers Will Continue to Shift More Costs to Patients

Expect to see continued increases in high-deductible health plans (HDHPs) and growth in insurance premiums for 2020. The percentage of workers covered by an HDHP grew to 30% in 2019—a 1% increase over 2018, but more than double the percentage covered in 2010.  This is a continuation of a trend we’ve seen since 2006; there are no signs of this abating, and this growth will continue in 2020. 
 
Insurance premiums have grown 54% in the last 10 years. The average family now must pay over $6,000 a year for coverage, making it tougher for them to pay for unexpected medical bills. According to a 2018 report, 77% of providers indicated it takes more than a month to collect any payment, and over 80% of providers reported being unable to collect $1,000+ within 30 days. 
 
These trends are readily evident in a 2019 survey of healthcare executives, in which 85% identified consumer self-pay as a concern for their organization (see below). In 2020, consumer self-pay will continue to become more prevalent and more of a challenge for providers already struggling to collect payments.
 
 
consumer self-pay, healthcare, RCM, 2020
Source: HFMA-Navigant RCM Survey (2019)
 
 

3. Retail Clinics and Telemedicine Will Have a Greater Impact

The growth of retail clinics and telemedicine, which has been a major trend over the past few years, will likely accelerate in 2020. You’ll also see an expanding array of available options for consumers. More and more large employers will set up their own worksite clinics, for example, or create special contracts with certain providers.
 
 
retail medicine, healthcare, RCM, 2020
 
 
This growth in retail, employer-based, and remote healthcare services reflects employers’ focus on productivity and retention and consumers’ desire for immediacy and ease. But as traditional providers’ patient volumes drop, this will further reduce revenue and margins, creating more of a financial strain on providers and forcing them to make changes.
 
 

4. The 2020 Election Will Be a Major Turning Point

Democrats and Republicans have differing opinions on what to do with the Affordable Care Act (ACA). Republicans want to continue to dismantle it, while Democrats would either build it back up or go with another alternative like universal healthcare. 
 
No matter the 2020 election outcome, it will be pivotal for the financial environment in healthcare. Either the uninsured will continue to grow to pre-ACA levels, or an enhanced model/new program will have to be paid for—meaning more reductions in reimbursements.
 
 

5. Patient Engagement Will Come Into Sharper Focus

When it comes to adopting new technology, healthcare providers have often lagged behind other customer-facing industries. Consumers want and expect a convenient, personalized experience across all brand encounters, regardless of industry.
 
The pressure is on for healthcare providers to move beyond traditional letters, phone calls, and portals and provide digital communication options that could help improve treatment outcomes and make it easier for patients to meet their financial obligations. Moving forward, expect to see rapid growth in patient engagement platforms that combine more of these services into one offering for both providers and patients. 
 
 

6. A/R Collector Productivity Will Become a Top Priority

Over the past few years, healthcare providers have focused on automating as many tasks as possible. Automation is key to achieving optimal efficiency, but the bigger issue (and greater challenge) is managing employees in ways that help them be more productive and effective. This is especially true in RCM, on the back end of the revenue cycle.
 
In 2020, managing A/R collector performance (whether employees are working remotely or on site) will become an urgent priority across the healthcare industry. Providers will increasingly look for ways to give A/R teams more valuable feedback and tools as a means of controlling labor costs, shortening the revenue cycle, and maximizing revenue recovery.
 
Are you looking to build an accountable, more effective A/R operation? You’ll find the answers you need in our eBook The Accountable Collector: Transforming Healthcare A/R with One Simple Fix. Download your free copy today, and start working toward a more profitable year.
 
 

 

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2020 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

Boost Your A/R Results — and Your Business Results — with Ease

In this brief guide, The Accountable Collector: Transforming Healthcare A/R with One Simple Fix, learn about the two big revenue drains every provider must address, and how to fill your “EHR platform gap” so you can start building an accountable collections team.

Why Ransomware Is Serious Business (and How to Minimize the Threat)

Why Ransomware Is Serious Business (and How to Minimize the Threat)

Everywhere you look these days, it’s in the headlines: another healthcare network, business, or government entity has suffered a debilitating ransomware attack. What used to be a curiosity is now a raging epidemic that shows no signs of slowing—and no sector is immune. By 2021, ransomware damages could cost the world $20 billion (57 times more than in 2015).
 
Even worse, cybercriminals are shifting their strategy. Not only are they demanding larger sums of money—from a few thousand dollars to upwards of $50,000 in just the past few years—but they’re increasingly targeting small and midsize businesses, which may be less sophisticated on the IT front and more willing to pay.
 
I recently sat down with Steve Lodin, senior director of cybersecurity operations/corporate security at Sallie Mae, to discuss this growing threat. We also offered advice for organizations looking to harden their defenses and prepare to respond in the event of an attack.
 
Here are a few highlights from our webinar, “Be Smart, Take Charge: What You Need to Know About Cybersecurity and Ransomware Prevention, Detection, and Response” (you can access the free webinar here).
 
 

How Does Ransomware Work?

Ransomware is malicious code that’s designed to encrypt files on an infected system or storage device to prevent the owner of the data from accessing it. Cybercriminals demand a ransom in return for a decryption key.
 
Ransomware can infiltrate in various ways. Among the most common are phishing emails containing embedded links and innocent-looking email attachments. Email attachments don’t have to contain ransomware code; once opened or downloaded, they can simply run additional code that instructs the host system to download ransomware code from a website.
 
Think about what this means. Among tens, hundreds, or thousands of employees, it takes just one person, one email, one visit to a malicious website. Once that ransomware code finds a vulnerability in the host environment, it can take over in short order.
 
Now, here’s the really bad news: paying these criminals doesn’t always bring data back. In fact, according to a 2017 study, only 26% of businesses that paid a ransom in 2017 received a decryption key. (Of those organizations that paid, 73% were attacked again.)
 
 

How Can You Protect Your Business and Limit the Fallout?

Every organization needs a three-pronged approach to effectively address the ransomware threat: prevention, detection, and response. You’ll want to begin with proactive measures that lessen your odds of a successful attack and limit your vulnerabilities when ransomware strikes.
 
 
SYSTEMS
  • Limit access to your systems, including local admin access (the principle of least privileges).
  • Ensure your system is patched, along with third-party apps like Adobe and Flash.
  • Secure the system with antivirus, anti-malware, and email security services that block known threats; implement tools that scan incoming emails or flag employee activity on known malicious websites.
  • Invest in good data backups.
  • Evaluate and monitor connections with third-party vendors. Allow access only as required for them to provide services, and only on network segments they need.
 
PEOPLE
  • Instruct employees to report suspected phishing emails.
  • Communicate with employees about current ransomware threats.
  • Test employees periodically with sample phishing emails and unfamiliar attachments to maintain awareness.
 
PLANNING
  • Create an incident response plan, ideally involving IT, legal counsel, internal and client communications, and forensic analysis; test and refine it regularly based on newly identified weaknesses and threats.
  • Invest in cybersecurity insurance, with a full understanding of what’s covered in the event of an attack.
  • Make sure vendor contracts include language requiring vendors to notify you within a short period of time of any attack on their systems. Know how to shut down connectivity quickly in case of attack.
  • Enhance your tech stack. An incident response manager tool will allow you to see how/where you’ve been compromised, act fast, and minimize the impact of a ransomware attack; a file integrity management solution can tell you whether any changes made were authorized by your existing change management system.
  • Make sure you have access to enough Bitcoin in case paying ransom is your only option; you might want to establish a Bitcoin account expressly for this purpose.
 
EMERGENCY RESPONSE
  • Check with law enforcement to determine your odds of recovering data. Depending on the type of ransomware deployed, you might be able to get a decryption key from the FBI’s database.
  • Perform a system analysis to determine what communications went outbound and what specific actions were taken on the system. These details will help you determine what gaps in your security stack need fixing.
 

Want to Learn More About Ransomware Preparedness?

If this post left you with more questions than you had before, you’ll want to tune into our recent webinar, “Be Smart, Take Charge: What You Need to Know About Cybersecurity and Ransomware Prevention, Detection, and Response.” You’ll learn more details about the ransomware threat and come away with more resources and specific tips you can use to better secure your systems and develop a thorough, effective response plan.
 
Don’t wait till ransomware strikes to understand what you’re up against and fortify your business. Access the free recording here, and start taking steps to minimize the threat.
 
 
 
 
 

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2019 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

Info and Insights You Won't Want to Miss

Here on the OS Blog, we aim to give you just the right mix of high-level views, tactics, and tools you can use to optimize your collection operations and results. Subscribe today for a steady stream of practical, empowering content delivered to your inbox weekly.

How to communicate with constituents using digital channels

How to communicate with constituents using digital channels

Despite the complexity and risks associated with using email and text for collection purposes, digital communication is the future for government agencies. Automated technology can greatly simplify compliance and the collection process itself, but it is important for...

For Leading Collection Agency, Ontario Reports™ Offers Simpler, More Sophisticated Reporting

Asset Recovery Group (ARG), a premier collection agency with 5.8 million account records and a growing client base, was struggling to fulfill extensive reporting requirements and glean timely business intelligence from its FACS® database. ARG’s overburdened team needed a better way to build and share reports, but most available solutions were too complex and costly.

Recently, ARG discovered Ontario Reports™, an intuitive reporting tool that integrates seamlessly with its FACS system (and all Ontario Systems’ core receivables platforms). An easy five-minute installation led to huge gains in efficiency, reporting capabilities, and report quality.

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A 5-Step Dive into HIPAA Compliance for Email and Text

A 5-Step Dive into HIPAA Compliance for Email and Text

 
Last week, I wrote about email and text guidelines the American Medical Association (AMA) set forth to help healthcare providers ensure their electronic communications comply with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Thanks to this roadmap, and current available technologies, providers and their business associates have what they need to email and text patients legally and responsibly when Protected Health Information (PHI) is at stake.
 
Today, I’m going to discuss HIPAA compliance more in depth—specifically, as defined and determined by the HIPAA Privacy Rule, the HIPAA Security Rule, and the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act. Each of these contributes to the pool of regulatory requirements controlling the exchange of PHI via electronic communications.
 
Understanding how these regulations (collectively referred to herein as “HIPAA requirements”) impact text and email communications is your first step toward launching a HIPAA-compliant text and email communication program.
 
 

First Things First: A Brief HIPAA Breakdown

Before we launch into our five-step dive, here’s a quick primer on how HIPAA requirements have evolved and expanded since 2000.
 
HHS Privacy Rule
Health and Human Services (HHS) published a final Privacy Rule in December 2000, which was later modified in August 2002. This rule set national standards for the protection of individually identifiable PHI by three types of covered entities: health plans, health care clearinghouses, and health care providers who conduct standard healthcare transactions electronically. Compliance with the Privacy Rule was required as of April 14, 2003 (April 14, 2004, for small health plans).
 
HHS Security Rule
HHS published a final Security Rule in February 2003. This rule sets national standards for protecting the confidentiality, integrity, and availability of electronic PHI. Compliance with the Security Rule was required as of April 20, 2005 (April 20, 2006 for small health plans).
 
HHS Enforcement Rule
The Enforcement Rule provides standards for the enforcement of all the Administrative Simplification Rules.
 
HHS Breach Notification Rule
Under certain circumstances, the Health and Human Services (HHS) Breach Notification Rule requires covered entities and business associates to report all PHI breaches to HHS and the impacted individuals. HHS enacted a final Omnibus rule that implements a number of provisions of the HITECH Act to strengthen the privacy and security protections for PHI established under HIPAA, thus finalizing the Breach Notification Rule.
 
Are you ready to text? Do you fully understand the requirements and risks? Don’t miss my recent webinar, “HIPAA’s Take on Email and Text: What You Need to Know to Comply and Serve Patients Well.” You can access the free recording here.
 
 

Now, Let’s Dive Into the HIPAA Requirements

These are five of the most important aspects of HIPAA as it pertains to email and text. If you’re considering using electronic communications to engage patients for any reason, these bottom-line takeaways should be top of mind.
 
Step #1: Relationships Matter
The HIPAA requirements for text and email communications differ depending on the relationship between the texting or emailing parties.
 
While all electronic communications sent from a covered entity or business associate to a patient must be secure, communications from the patient to the covered entity or business associate need not be secure. This is because the HIPAA requirements do not require covered entities and business associates to be legally responsible for the encryption of PHI sent by the patient to the covered entity or business associate.
 
Nevertheless, the covered entity or business associate still bears some responsibility regarding email and text communications received from a patient (see Step #2).
 
Step #2: Consumer Warnings Matter
As I mentioned in my previous blog post, providers and business associates who offer patients an opportunity to communicate electronically using a text or email service must warn consumers about the insecurity of the communication platform.
 
According to the AMA’s guidelines related to HIPAA requirements for communications between provider/business associate and patient, when communicating with patients electronically, the provider/business associate must also inform patients of:
 
  • The inherent limitations of electronic communication, including possible breach of privacy or confidentiality issues; and
  • The difficulty in verifying the identity of the parties when texting or emailing and the potential impact of delayed responses.
 
The provider/business associate should also provide patients with an opportunity to accept or decline electronic communication before privileged information is transmitted, and they should document the patient’s decision to accept or decline the opportunity.
 
Lastly, the provider/business associate should take steps to help the patient understand that any texts or emails he or she might send the provider/business associate are not secure and may be subject to intrusion, hacking, and identity theft.
 
 
Step #3: Patient Expectations Matter
The HIPAA requirements are not prescriptive with regard to text and email communications. Rather, they expect covered entities and business associates to meet the expectations within reason.
 
For example, if a patient demands the medical collection agency email a copy of his or her statement to a Gmail address and the collection agency has absolutely no process in place to email patients, HIPAA would not require the medical collection agency to accommodate the patient by implementing an email communication system.
 
On the other hand, if a patient indicates he or she does not want the medical collection agency to leave voicemail messages on his or her cell phone and to send texts instead (assuming the agency has a text message program in place), HIPAA would require the medical collection agency to cease leaving voicemail messages and restrict communications with that patient to text.
 
Step #4: Playground Rules Don’t Matter
Covered entities and their business associates often ask whether they can interpret a patient’s unsolicited email or text as consent to electronic communications.
 
The assumption behind the question is best reflected in the familiar line, “Well, they started it.” While this may work as a playground rule, it fails under the HIPAA requirements.
 
Parties who wish to communicate with patients electronically must obtain the patient’s consent to continue using the particular form of electronic communication, even when a patient initiates the text or the email.
 
Step #5: Encryption Matters
Email and text communications are inherently insecure; they’re not secured by default, and they’re easy to hack.
 
An individual’s email account can easily be accessed by a third party if a weak or easy-to-guess password is used for the email account. A provider’s email system is also vulnerable to attack if the organization does not use two-factor authentication and other simple controls such as passwords and screen time-outs.
 
Because all consumer-grade email platforms and texting programs are known to be insecure means of communication, their use for professional purposes may be considered in itself a breach of the HIPAA requirements.
 
The HIPAA Security Rule §164.312(e) requires covered entities and their business associates to consider the encryption of communications as an Addressable Implementation Specification. This is a defined term under the HIPAA Security Rule. Providers and their business associates must comply with this rule when contemplating the use of electronic communications.
 
 

HIPAA Is Complex, but Email and Text Needn’t Be

Technologies that can secure text and email communications as required by HIPAA are readily available today. In fact, providers have a range of options that are designed for this very purpose and perform their job well.
 
Once you understand what HIPAA requires and have the right tools in place, electronic communications will become less of an ongoing concern and more of an asset—a major advantage, in fact—for your operations and your business. Frankly, you’ll wonder how you ever got along without them.
 
 

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2019 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

Info and Insights You Won't Want to Miss

Here on the OS Blog, we aim to give you just the right mix of high-level views, tactics, and tools you can use to optimize your collection operations and results. Subscribe today for a steady stream of practical, empowering content delivered to your inbox weekly.

Are You Ready to Text?

Take charge of compliance and start texting with confidence. This free eBook explains how.

Electronic Patient Communications in the Wake of HIPAA: The Ban Has Lifted

Electronic Patient Communications in the Wake of HIPAA: The Ban Has Lifted

Healthcare providers remain skittish when it comes to email or text communications, and their reluctance is understandable.
 
Historically, both email and text messages were considered inherently unsecure modes of communication. In addition, many healthcare providers and business associates believe the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) and the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rule’s restrictions on the use, transfer, and storage of demographic data and Protected Health Information (PHI) make email and text messaging far too risky.
 
In response to the concerns of the healthcare community as well as the financial services industry—which has similar needs to protect the confidentiality of personally identifiable information—the cellular phone and internet industries have built safe, secure electronic communication platforms that secure information both in transit and at rest.
 
If email and text are used properly and with the controls required by the American Medical Association (AMA) to send electronic messages containing PHI, healthcare providers can now embrace these forms of patient communications.
 
 

AMA Requirements for Email and Text

As the AMA makes clear, HIPAA does not specifically prohibit sending PHI by text or email. However, it does require the electronic communication platform to include:
 
  • Safeguards to ensure the confidentiality of PHI at rest and in transit;
  • Controls for who can access PHI;
  • Permissions for what authorized personnel can do with PHI when they access it; and
  • Processes to prevent the interception of plain text messages.
 
Healthcare providers and business associates should exercise due diligence when selecting a text or email communication platform provider. At a minimum, they should require the provider to ensure its text or email platform can support the AMA’s four requirements of an electronic communication platform.
 
The AMA has further clarified its position on sending PHI by text or email in Section 2.3.1 of the AMA’s Code of Ethics. As this section makes clear, concerns remain about privacy and confidentiality when communicating and transmitting PHI electronically. Physicians must uphold the same ethical standards when communicating with patients electronically as they do during other clinical encounters. They must also ensure the method of communication—whether virtual, telephonic, or in person—is appropriate to the patient’s clinical need and to the information being conveyed.
 
While HHS and the Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) do not prohibit healthcare providers and practitioners from communicating with their patients by text messages or email, healthcare providers and practitioners cannot disavow their responsibilities under the law, HIPAA, the HIPAA Privacy and Security Rule, or the AMA Code of Ethics by hiring a business associate to manage their electronic communications. 
 
Business associate agreements must include specific provisions regarding the use of text messaging and email and delineate any privacy or security requirements of the covered entity.
 
 
Are you ready to text? Do you fully understand the requirements and risks? Don’t miss my recent webinar, “HIPAA’s Take on Email and Text: What You Need to Know to Comply and Serve Patients Well.” You can access the free recording here.
 
 

AMA Guidelines for Email and Text

Here are the AMA’s specific guidelines regarding electronic patient communications. These standard practices help to ensure day-to-day compliance and ethical, responsible patient care.
 
Physicians who choose to communicate electronically with patients should:
 
(a) Uphold professional standards of confidentiality and protection of privacy, security, and integrity of patient information.
 
(b) Notify the patient of the inherent limitations of electronic communication, including possible breach of privacy or confidentiality, difficulty in validating the identity of the parties, and possible delays in response.
 
Such disclaimers do not absolve physicians of responsibility to protect the patient’s interests. Patients should have the opportunity to accept or decline electronic communication before privileged information is transmitted. The patient’s decision to accept or decline email communication containing privileged information should be documented in the medical record.
 
(c) Advise the patient of the limitations of these channels when a patient initiates electronic communication.
 
(d) Obtain the patient’s consent to continue electronic communication when a patient initiates electronic communication.
 
(e) Present medical information in a manner that meets professional standards. Diagnostic or therapeutic services must conform to accepted clinical standards.
 
(f) Be aware of relevant laws that determine when a patient-physician relationship has been established.
 
 

For Providers and Their Patients, a Big Leap Forward

Healthcare professionals should welcome the AMA’s efforts to advance communications between patients and their providers. Text and email can be used to improve the patient experience, inform patients of their rights, remind them of important appointments, deliver treatment plans, follow up with recommendations, and even establish a lifeline between patients and physicians.
 
Today’s patients appreciate and deserve the opportunity to communicate with providers using a variety of methods. The AMA’s recognition of this fact, and the framework it has provided for healthcare-related electronic communications, is a major win for all involved.
 
 
 
 

Disclaimer: Ontario Systems is a technology company and provides this blog article solely for general informational and marketing purposes. You should not rely on the content of this material for any other purpose or as specific guidance for your company. Ontario Systems’ advice, services, tools and products described herein do not guarantee compliance with any law or industry standard. You are ultimately responsible for your own company’s actions and compliance efforts. Because everyone’s situation is different, you must consult your own attorneys, accountants, and/or other advisors to obtain specific advice on your company’s compliance, legal, tax, regulatory and/or other business needs. Despite Ontario Systems’ efforts to provide current and up-to-date information, you need to recognize that the information contained herein may become outdated quickly and may contain errors and/or other inaccuracies.

© 2019 Ontario Systems, LLC. All rights reserved. Information contained in this document is subject to change. Reproduction of this publication is not permitted without the express permission of Ontario Systems, LLC.

Info and Insights You Won't Want to Miss

Here on the OS Blog, we aim to give you just the right mix of high-level views, tactics, and tools you can use to optimize your collection operations and results. Subscribe today for a steady stream of practical, empowering content delivered to your inbox weekly.

Are You Ready to Text?

Take charge of compliance and start texting with confidence. This free eBook explains how.